Title: Housing Crisis

Takeaway: Subprime.

Seat: Back

Logged: 05 May 16 (Thursday in the PM)

Copyright:

Time: 2 minutes

Replies: 9

Revisions: 8

Publicity: Superfeed

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This is why you believe in karma, “whatever it is.”

Eight years ago, “almost to the day,” you had decided to go home after lunch instead of going back to work. “I just wasn’t feeling it that day.” When you got back, there were candles burning “all over the house.” Your wife walked out of the kitchen in lingerie. Then a guy she worked with walked out from behind her in a bathrobe. “Now, I knew she had serious issues before I married her.” You took off the mirrored sunglasses just so I could see that your intensely textured irises, like decorative medals drawn toward one another from ribbon-like crow’s feet, were made of things the sunglasses allowed you to keep from every random person you had to talk to. “But this,” you guffawed, “this was fuckin’ nuts.” And you sat back. “Wait for it.”

You were in finance at the time. It was two-thousand eight. “So you know what that means.” You were in securities. You were selling loans. You were packaging loans with other loans. I think you were also creating them while you were selling them. Let’s face it though, I wasn’t sure what you did, and neither were you. “I didn’t know what was going on. It wasn’t clear.” You didn’t say that like you were making excuses, but like you were a victim. You rubbed your face and put your sunglasses back on. “The thing is, we were about to lose our house too because of it all.”

But there was a silver lining. “I didn’t want any part of finance anymore.” All those years at the office, you used to go to a bar down the street for lunch and a drink. The day you left the office for good, you walked right over to the bar for lunch as usual, and asked, “Do you guys need any help?” Thankfully, they knew you pretty well, and they liked you. And that’s where you met your new girlfriend, “Who’s awesome.”

After you walked into the house on that devastating day, you were “just in a state of shock.” You didn’t say anything to your wife or the guy standing next to her. “I walked straight to my bedroom and shut the door.”

Then you leaned toward me, closer this time, and took your sunglasses off again. I could see freckles in your crow’s feet. Each one spoke a thousand words when it wasn’t hidden inside the little wrinkles. “This is how much stronger her self defense mechanisms were than her sanity.” You tilted your head a little, which meant get ready for it. “She came to the bedroom after me, stood there in the doorway in her lacy satin panties and said, ‘You didn’t even say hi to Rob.’”

Revisions

Horse » Authorship
Horse » 2:39 PM 21 Jun 19
Elk » 12:57 PM 08 May 16
Elk » 10:59 AM 07 May 16
Elk » 6:43 AM 06 May 16
Elk » 6:42 AM 06 May 16
Horse » 10:27 PM 05 May 16

The Thread (9)

 Author's voice in grey. 

  1. Retitle to Housing Crisis and cut the last line.

  2. Although, upon near immediate reflection, I do like the idea that this scenario is itself subprime, and that “subprime” is in fact even more of a euphemism for the degree of the scenario’s subprimacy.

  3. The piece still needs an excerpt, so “subprime” could go there, too.

  4. Requested changes made, plus some liberties. Have a look and share thoughts.

  5. The detail of the freckles in crow’s feet is sharp and spiky. Plus, just the sound of those words together is satisfying.

  6. So is it “crows’ feet”?

  7. It’s “crow’s feet.” Or it can also be “crow’s-feet.” I did site-specific Google searches – “site:washingonpost.com” and “site:nytimes.com” – of the Times and the Post.

  8. But pluralized?

  9. Oh wait — I guess there’d only most usually be two, and the plural thus comes via feet.

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